Double Standards for Access to Care?

Following a feature on CCSVI this spring,  Dr. Bradley Diddle, a Barrie Ontario Cardiologist wrote a letter to the editor of Maclean’s magazine. Dr. Diddle’s comments raise an interesting argument of double standards and equal access to care in Canada.

 “The resistance to CCSVI treatment for MS from the neurological community surprises me because they aren’t even consistent when it comes to this kind of problem. As a cardiologist I am asked by neurologists on a daily basis to investigate patients with unexplained strokes to see if they have a small hole in their heart called the patent foramen ovale, PFO, and if I find one to have it closed with an invasive procedure. This is despite the fact that there are no clinical trials to show us that this is the right thing to do for these patients. There does appear to be a slightly higher incidence of PFO in unexplained strokes although they are present in about 25% of everyone on the planet and some observational information showing that this reasonably safe and not too costly invasive procedure appears helpful. To me, this sounds a lot like CCSVI, an association that has identified the procedure that can address the abnormality and some early observations that suggest a benefit. My neurology colleagues need to start moving forward and offer this procedure to MS patients and see how they respond”.

Clearly there is a precedent set in Canada that allows our medical professionals to perform invasive procedures based on ‘observational information showing that this reasonably safe and not too costly invasive procedure appears helpful’. So what’s all the debate about?

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4 Responses to Double Standards for Access to Care?

  1. Shirley Renshaw says:

    THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU. THANK YOU.
    From a CCSVI sufferer. 22 years is enough for me and I am willing to have an little invasive out patient, fully awake angioplasty. This makes sense in all areas. The MS Neurological community will not resign to the fact that this is NOT their expertise and are causing a turf war. Obviously the people who have this condition know this fight is futile and all will be at the people who are in need if this treatment expense. It is so very wrong and I do hope the Vascular community will speak loud and strong for those who need their help.

  2. Jacinthe Savoie says:

    Very nice to finally hear someone with conmen sense. If you could all tell the government that the money is controlling this situation. To look elsewhere for the answer. We could eliminate all this hard feelings and try to get some MSers some relief from this terrible disease. The NMSS and the neurologist should not be the only influence the government should go to. Look outside the box were the info has not been corupted by $$$$ I am a MS patient and will have to spend our own money and go out of the country to get fixed. And we are supposed to be the wonderful country Canada that everyone wants to come and live in . Maybe we should all move to Kuwait were the government is taking care of his MS patients.

    Jacinthe Savoie

  3. hcosburn says:

    @ Shirley – Thank YOU, for your comments. I know this is a big battle, but I do hope that whether you get the CCSVI treatment at home or away, that you get the treatment you need and see incredible results like some of your fellow MSers have!

  4. hcosburn says:

    @ Jacinthe – It’s unfortunate that MS patients do not have access to the care they need and deserve at home in Canada (I am Canadian too!).
    Until our goverment wises up and does the right thing, I sure am glad that there are knowledgable doctors around the world who are able to help patients like yourself!

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